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First for Women Magazine: Worries Solved

June 25, 2012

I just turned 52, and I’m seeing signs of thick, dark veins on my legs. I really don’t’ want to have to wear long pants every summer. Is there a supplement that can help?

 There is. In treating nearly 55 percent of my female patients who struggle with varicose veins, I’ve discovered a surprisingly simple fix: vitamin K2. When levels of this nutrient are deficient (as they are in up to 50 percent of the women I see with prominent varicose veins), calcium can exit the bones and coat veins. This leads to hardening nad clogs that make it difficult for blood to flow back up the legs. Instead, blood pools downward, causing veins to stretch and bulge. But restoring K2 levels helps reverse this calcification to rejuvenate blood flow. This works to heal vein damage and protect against future problems.

To get the benefits, I recommend supplementing with 100 mcg of the supplement. Most women see a noticeable reduction in the appearance of varicose veins within six to eight weeks. As a bonus, increased intake of vitamin K2 cuts the risk of heart disease by 42 percent.

 

 

 I’m yeast-sensitive, so I take probiotics and limit my intake of sugar. But when hot weather hits, I still struggle with tiredness, bloat and yeast infections. Is there anything else I can do?

 You’re on the right track—taking probiotics and avoiding sugar, alcohol and processed carbs is key to keeping yeast at bay. But I suggest one more line of defense during the summer, when hot and humid environments make it easier for yeast to grow and spread: Take a daily supplement with 250 mcg of molybdenum. This mineral breaks down acetaldehyde, a toxin produced by yeast that causes fatigue, bloat and weight gain. Molybdenum also works to prevent yeast from multiplying, essentially giving probiotics a helping hand. Most of my clients see a reduction in symptoms within 10 days, though I advise taking molybdenum throughout the season to ensure over-growth doesn’t take hold.

 

 

I’ve heard that krill oil is a better source of omega-3s than fish oil. Should I try it?

 Yes! New research suggests that the absorption rate for the omega-3 fatty acids in krill oil is 10 to 15 times higher than it is for standard fish oil. Plus, krill oil’s antioxidant capacity is up to 48 times greater than that of fish oil.

 This combination of antioxidant potency and improved bioavailability adds up to major health boons: Early studies have found that krill oil’s antioxidant capacity is up to 48 times greater than that of fish oil.

 This combination of antioxidant potency and improved bioavailability adds up to major health boons: Early studies have found that krill oil can reduce joint pain by 29 percent in two weeks, lower heart-harming LDL cholesterol levels by 34 percent in six weeks and improve mental focus by 49 percent in three months. And while krill oil hasn’t been the subject of as many weight-loss studies as fish oil has, animal trials have revealed that krill oil can switch on fat=burning genes and dial down the production of hunger hormones. My recommendation: Take 500 mg of krill oil daily.

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